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National Immunisation Program Schedule

Health professionals

Find information that will help you deliver your service to your patients

What is the NIP Schedule?

The National Immunisation Program (NIP) Schedule is a series of immunisations given at specific times throughout your life. The immunisations range from birth through to adulthood.

All vaccines listed in the NIP Schedule are free. Eligibility for free vaccines under the NIP is linked to eligibility for Medicare benefits.

To get the best possible protection, make sure you have your immunisations on time, every time. The NIP Schedule below shows which vaccines you should get and when.

National Immunisation Program schedule (portrait)

This schedule card provides information on changes to the National Immunisation Program childhood schedule from 1 April 2019.

National Immunisation Program schedule (landscape)

This schedule card provides information on changes to the National Immunisation Program childhood schedule from 1 April 2019.

National Immunisation Program Schedule – from 1 April 2019

 

Childhood vaccination (also see influenza vaccine)

National Immunisation Program Schedule (from 1 April 2019)
Age Disease Vaccine brand

Birth

H-B-Vax® II Paediatric or Engerix B® Paediatric

2 months
Can be given from 6 weeks of age

Infanrix® hexa

Prevenar 13®

Rotarix®

4 months

Infanrix® hexa

Prevenar 13®

Rotarix®

6 months

Infanrix® hexa

Additional vaccines for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children
(QLD, NT, WA and SA) and medically at-risk children[c]

Prevenar 13®

12 months

Nimenrix®

M-M-R® II or Priorix®

Prevenar 13®

Additional vaccines for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children
(QLD, NT, WA and SA)

Vaqta® Paediatric

18 months

Act-HIB®

Priorix-Tetra® or ProQuad® Infanrix® or Tripacel®

Additional vaccines for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children
(QLD, NT, WA and SA)

Vaqta® Paediatric

4 years

Infanrix® IPV or Quadracel®

Additional vaccines for medically at-risk children[c]

Pneumovax 23®

  • a  Hepatitis B vaccine: Should be given to all infants as soon as practicable after birth. The greatest benefit is if given within 24 hours, and must be given within 7 days.
  • b Rotavirus vaccine: First dose must be given by 14 weeks of age, the second dose by 24 weeks of age.
  • c Refer to the current edition of The Australian Immunisation Handbook for all medical risk factors.

Adolescent vaccination (also see influenza vaccine)

National Immunisation Program Schedule (from 1 April 2019)
Age Disease Vaccine brand

12-13 years
(School programs[d])

Gardasil®9 
Boostrix®
 
14-16 years
(School programs[d])
Nimenrix®
  • d Contact your state or territory health service for school grades eligible for vaccination.
  • e Observe Gardasil®9 dosing schedules by age and at-risk conditions. 2 doses: 9 to <15 years - 6 months minimum interval. 3 doses: ≥15 years and/or have certain medical conditions - 0, 2 and 6 month schedule. Only 2 doses funded on the NIP unless 12-13 year old has certain medical risk factors.

Adult vaccination (also see influenza vaccine)

National Immunisation Program Schedule (from 1 April 2019)
Age Disease Vaccine brand
15 – 49 years
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with medical risk factors[c]
Pneumovax 23®
50 years and over
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
Pneumovax 23®
65 years and over Pneumovax 23®
70–79 years[f] Zostavax®
Pregnant women Boostrix® or Adacel®
  • c Refer to the current edition of The Australian Immunisation Handbook for all medical risk factors.
  • f All people aged 70 years old, with a five year catch-up program for people aged 71-79 years old until 31 October 2021.
  • g Single dose recommended each pregnancy, ideally between 20-32 weeks, but may be given up until delivery.
  • h Refer to annual influenza information for recommended vaccine brand for age.

Flu (influenza) vaccines

If you belong to any of the categories below, you are eligible to receive a free flu shot each year.

Flu (influenza) vaccines

If you belong to any of the categories below, you are eligible to receive a free flu shot each year.
Aged Comments
6 months and over with certain medical risk factors This includes anyone aged 6 months and over who has:
  • heart disease
  • severe asthma (requiring frequent medical consultations or use of multiple medications)
  • chronic lung conditions
  • diseases of the nervous system which affect your breathing
  • impaired immunity
  • diabetes
  • kidney disease
  • haemoglobinopathies
  • children aged six months to 10 years on long-term aspirin therapy
All Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 6 months and over  None 
65 years and over None
Pregnant women Any trimester during each pregnancy

Catch up immunisations

All people aged less than 20 years are eligible for free catch up vaccines.

Adult refugees and humanitarian entrants are eligible for free catch up vaccines.

State and territory immunisation schedules

State and territory health departments also fund some additional vaccines. It is important to also check the immunisation schedule for your area.

International immunisation schedules

The World Health Organization (WHO) provides information on worldwide immunisation schedules. Visit the website and select the country of interest to view:

  • a profile for that country
  • the relevant immunisation schedule
  • information on disease surveillance
  • vaccine coverage.

Next steps

Last updated: 
14 June 2019