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Health professionals

Find information that will help you deliver your service to your patients

During the visit

Health professionals

Find information that will help you deliver your service to your patients

What to expect at a vaccination visit

During a vaccination visit, your doctor or provider will ask you some questions. This is to determine if there is any concern about vaccinating you or your child. Your vaccination provider will look at the factors in the pre-vaccination checklist.

Always ask your provider if you have any questions or would like more information.

Pre-vaccination checklist

Some of the factors your vaccination provider will consider before vaccinating you or your child are outlined in this pre-vaccination checklist.

It is important to let your vaccination provider know if the person to be vaccinated:

  • is unwell
  • has a disease that lowers immunity (e.g. leukaemia, cancer, HIV/AIDS) or is having treatment that lowers immunity (e.g. steroid medicines taken in the mouth such as cortisone and prednisone, radiotherapy, chemotherapy)
  • is an infant of a mother who was receiving therapy that reduced her immunity during pregnancy (e.g. biological disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs))
  • has had a severe reaction following any vaccine
  • has any severe allergies (to anything)
  • has had any vaccine in the past month
  • has had an injection of an antibody of any kind, or received any blood products or a whole blood transfusion within the past year
  • is pregnant
  • has a past history of Guillain-Barré syndrome
  • was born prematurely
  • has a chronic illness
  • has a bleeding disorder
  • identifies as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander
  • does not have a functioning spleen
  • is planning a pregnancy or anticipating parenthood
  • is a parent, grandparent or carer of a newborn
  • lives with someone who has a disease that lowers immunity (e.g. leukaemia, cancer, HIV/AIDS), or lives with someone who is having treatment that lowers immunity (e.g. steroid medicines taken in the mouth such as cortisone and prednisone, radiotherapy, chemotherapy)
  • is planning travel
  • works in an occupation or does activities for which vaccination is sometimes needed (discuss with doctor/nurse and be specific).

Consent

You must give your consent (verbal or in writing) before receiving any vaccines. Parents or guardians must provide consent for children or people in their care.

How vaccines are given

To receive a vaccine, you or your child will generally get a needle in the arm or leg, or drops in the mouth. 

This will depend on:

  • the type of vaccine
  • your child’s age and size.

Your doctor or health provider will talk with you about how you or your child will receive a specific vaccine.

Last updated: 
30 November 2017